Tag Archives: cool

Is it better to go cold or hot?

tea

Have you ever wondered what kind of water is best for your body during a meal? We order hot tea when we’re sick but ice cold water after a long day at the beach. Which is best for your overall health? Sorry to upset those ice cold water lovers, but drinking cold water can be harmful, especially if you eat unhealthy. Cold water solidifies oils in your body that you consume after eating and slows digestion. Once the solidified particles react with acids that break down your food, they are absorbed by the intestine faster than solid food. The result is a film that lines the intestine and create fatty deposits that can lead to cancer.

What’s worse, the more oily foods you eat, the more rapidly this process occurs in your body. Eating unhealthily and drinking cold water every time you consume food can lead to other grave health risks such as heart disease and diabetes.

Since it takes energy for your body to cool down low temperature water, that means it takes calories to do so. If you drink warmer water with a meal, like hot soup or tea, all of these risks stated above will be less likely to occur. Take a moment to think about what you’re eating for dinner tonight and pair your meal with a nice green or herbal tea. Or pick a water-based soup like thai coconut or chicken noodle.

All of these steps reduce your risk for illness and diseases. To check out more about heart health, visit http://www.heart.org. To learn more about water, check out filtercon.com or call us at 800-550-1995.

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az-teas.com

Exercising in the Heat

prevent-heat-illness-art

Summer is here. We all want to have those great bikini or board short bodies, but a lot of us exercise outside and it gets hot in the summer. So what should we do?

Well, let’s learn about what happens to us when exercising in the heat. When running in hotter weather (when the temperature is above 75 degrees Farenheight), our bodies spend about 70% of the energy that they normally would be using towards our workout to just cool down. Only 30% goes to moving our arms and legs and breathing. What’s more, the heat, humidity, and UV rays all have a negative effect on us because we aren’t used to putting our bodies to work in such harsh environments. The heat makes us sweat, the humidity doesn’t allow our cooling processes to occur as effectively, and UV rays burn our skin which makes our core temperature higher.

But the good news is that after 1-2 weeks of working out in hotter weather, your body starts to acclimate. John Woo, M.D., a clinical associate professor at the University of Washington School of Medicine says, “Your body will expect circulating plasma volume and become more efficient in sweating, and, psychologically, you just start dealing with the heat better.” To help this process occur safely, start out by cutting your workout in the heat in half and add 5% every day or 10% every couple of days or so. You can even finish the rest of your workout inside (do core work, lift weights, do a yoga routine) until you get back up to 100% of your workout in the heat. Other things you should be doing to help this process occur safely are: drink 8 glasses of water throughout the day, make sure to get enough electrolytes, and use sunscreen.

If you follow these simple steps to working out in the heat, your body will thank you. To learn more about the body and effects of water on the body, check out our other blog posts or visit our website (www.filtercon.com) to learn about why it’s important to filter your water at home.

Source:

What Running in the Heat Does to Your Body. SHAPE Fitness. 7 July 2015. http://www.shape.com/fitness/cardio/what-running-heat-does-your-body

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