Tag Archives: Filtercon

Drinking Water and Weight Loss

Weight Loss

With summer comes so many delicious things to eat and drink; hot dogs and hamburgers at barbecues, ice cream from your favorite shoppe, and fruity frozen drinks with tiny umbrellas. Although these are wonderful every once in a while, they’re not the healthiest foods. If you’re trying to get back on track after one too many chili dogs, then you should at least consider this easy way to help with weight loss: drink more water!

WebMD describes a study done that followed people who changed their daily diets to include 8 glasses of water/day. The results showed that these people felt more full and did not eat as much. Their metabolisms increased by 30% within 30-40 of drinking 17 oz of water. For men, metabolic rate increased because of fat burn. In women, metabolic rate rose due to the increase in the breakdown of carbohydrates.

Woman drinking water

Researchers estimated that over a year, more than 17,000 calories were saved due to the increase in water consumption. That equaled to the study participants being about 5 lbs lighter throughout the year. In actuality, almost half of the calories burned from drinking water was due to the body’s attempt to heat the ingested water.

No matter if you’re trying to lose weight or just trying to be more healthy, you should always try to drink as close to 8 glasses a day as possible. Water is not only 70% of your body’s makeup, it fuels your brain and organs to keep your processes running smoothly. The best kind of water for your body is water that has no contaminants, chlorine, heavy metals, etc. You can make sure that you’re getting pure water by buying a filtration system for the tap water that goes through your pipes. To learn more, visit http://www.filtercon.com or call Filtercon Technologies at 800-550-1995.

Source:
Drinking Water May Speed Weight Loss. WebMD. http://www.webmd.com/diet/20040105/drinking-water-may-speed-weight-loss

Is Your Local San Diego County Beach Water Unsafe?

Image result for ocean water

The California drought has taught us many things. 1) We need to use less water in our homes 2) More natural disasters occur when our land is too dry 3) Less rainfall is good for our oceans? Yes, this is true. Rainfall has actually polluted the waters along the San Diego coast in the past due to the large amount of toxins that the water picks up along the way. So, less rainfall=less polluted waters.


According to the environmental group Heal The Bay, which assesses water quality for Southern California beaches and assigns them grades, 96% of the area’s 72 beaches are pretty healthy. That means that out of an A-F grade, they received either an A or a B. Their health ratings have increased 2% in the past 5 years, partially due to a program that plants water cleansing plants in creeks to filter water going to the ocean.

The areas that were rated among the cleanest in San Diego County included San Elijo State Beach and Cardiff State Beach in Encinitas, Ocean Beach Pier, Point Loma Lighthouse and Silver Strand in Coronado.

However, the areas that proved to have the worst water quality were Cottonwood Creek Outlet at Moonlight Beach in Encinitas, Seascape Surf Beach Park in Solana Beach, San Diego River Dog Beach in Ocean Beach, the pier and Cortez Avenue at Imperial Beach, the mouth of the Tijuana River, and beaches at Border Field State Park.

Sarah Sikich, who is vice president of Heal the Bay, says, “In a time of severe drought, it’s madness to send billions of gallons of runoff to pollute the sea when we could be capturing and cleansing that water for daily use. The rains will return, and when they do we need to capture this valuable resource to maximize our local water supplies and keep polluted water out of our ocean.”

We need to do so much more to help our environment and prevent runoff from polluting our oceans. To check out more about how you can help, visit healthebay.org. Also check out Filtercon Technologies for our water filtering products to make sure that you aren’t drinking dirty city water (www.filtercon.com).

Source:

Moonlight: Swami’s Beaches Score Low on Water Health. Encinitas Patch. June 18th, 2015. http://patch.com/california/encinitas/moonlight-swamis-beaches-score-low-water-health-0

Images:

www.wall321.com

healthebay.org

tahoe.ca.gov

switchboard.nrdc.org

www.sbck.org

BPA. How Does it Really Affect Us?

bottles on bottles

Have you ever wondered what’s in those water bottles that you hear about being detrimental to your health but that everyone uses? It’s BPA, or Bisphenol A. But what does that really mean and how does it affect our bodies?

baby w bottle

Well, BPA is an industrial chemical that disrupts hormone messages. It’s been used since 1960 to make certain plastics; water bottles, baby bottles, toys, and some consumer goods. Some canned goods not only contain this harmful plastic but also include resin in its deadly composition. It increases estrogen and decreases testosterone. It can seep into your foods and beverages and affects babies the most because of their small body systems. This is very bad because babies need hormones to grow correctly, and BPA blocks them. It has also been linked to Type 2 diabetes and several types of cancers.

recycle

Discourse on BPA is highly controversial. But would you take a chance on your health or the health of your family? These days many bottles are required to be labeled if they contain traces of BPA.  If you see a recycling symbol on a bottle, you should check for its density. #2 HDPE (high density polyethylene), #4 LDPE (low density polyethylene), and #5 PP(polypropylene) are safe to use. But most water bottles are made out of #1 density. They are intended for a single usage, but it is common for people to reuse plastic bottles even after one use.  If you see a water bottle with the #7 recycling symbol, you should probably not drink from it. Reports have said that these water bottles “may” leak BPA. But again, you should always ask yourself if you want to take those kinds of risks for your health…

plastic bottles

If you are one of those people that use water bottles from the grocery store frequently or switch out using different water bottles that you haven’t checked for BPA (when you bought it, it should say on the label), then you should think about getting a reusable, BPA-free bottle. Filtercon Technologies has one that not only is BPA-free, but also filters chlorine out of water so that city drinking water is better for your health. If you want to know more about BPA-free materials or Filtercon’s water bottle, check it out on the website http://www.filtercon.com.

Filtercon Technologies is a full-line water filtration company. We have systems for your faucets, under-the sink, or your whole house! Call 800-550-1995 to learn more or visit our website http://www.filtercon.com

Image sources:

docsfitnesstips.blogspot.com

www.inhabitots.com

www.jacksonville-al.org

livescience.com

The Irony of Bottling Companies and the Drought

One bottling company’s vague policies have sparked discourse on the relationship between California’s drought and bottling water in California. How much groundwater are these companies using? Would it affect the drought if these companies no longer bottled? Who oversees groundwater usage rules? Which companies in California use the most water for these purposes? These are questions that have been asked frequently during the eruption of conversation about bottling water and the drought. Let’s take a further look into the conversation…

palomar

It started with Palomar Mountain Spring Water, a bottling company based in San Diego County and located on Palomar Mountain. How bottled water companies work is that they buy land located on large reservoirs of groundwater and use the water to bottle and disperse to the community for a fee. These resources do not have limits; “The spring is also not subject to the kind of drought restrictions that are causing residents across San Diego County to let lawns brown and leave toilets unflushed,” says Morgan Cook from the Union Tribune. It is also uncertain how much groundwater is being used by these companies for bottling purposes because they are not required to release information about usage of the springs that they own.

groundwater

-But wait, shouldn’t that be public information? ‘”The complaints that we don’t really know what they’re doing, the complaint that they’re taking a public resource and commercializing it at a great profit- these are all real problems…,” says Peter Gleick who is the president of a water think tank in Oakland.’ The Union Tribune posted this and other thoughts about this in their article No Drought Rules for Bottled Water, which was released today (6/8/15).

plastic water bottle

Another issue that the article brought up was the fact that Palomar Springs is just one of many bottling companies that have taken advantage of the fact that bottled water natural resources are unrestricted. Six companies in the San Diego area alone are included in this category, of which draw from resources like the Lakeside springs, Palomar Mountain area, Santee, and private wells. And because these companies have the right to not have to report the amounts of water they use, no one knows which companies are using more than others.

All of this being said, bottled water is not the ultimate source of the California drought. Although these companies may be helping to exacerbate its severity, the drought situation in California derives from many other sources, including natural disasters (forest fires, earthquakes, and storms), climate change, and human impact on the environment.

If you’d like to learn more about the article in the San Diego Union Tribune, check out their link below. If you’d like to learn how you can help the environment save and recycle water, visit filtercon.com for more information.

Sources:

San Diego Union Tribune, “No Drought Rules for Bottled Water”. 6/8/15.  http://www.utsandiego.com/news/2015/jun/08/tp-no-drought-rules-for-bottled-water/2/?#article-copy

http://www.palomarwater.com/contact.php

http://www.groundwateruk.org/Image-Gallery.aspx

https://learn.flexport.com/import-water-bottles/

How Alkaline Can Alleviate Bladder Issues

One of the body’s main ways of discarding minerals that it doesn’t need is through urination. It’s a common process, most people do it at least once a day. But it’s also so common that we don’t think about it until we’re having issues actually doing so.

You can tell a lot by your urine- the color, the smell, the thickness- all of these factors change by what your body is going through. Urine can also be more acidic than basic. When this happens, your body is telling you that it is dehydrated.

bladder problemsOne main bladder issue that people face due to acidic urine is a syndrome called interstitial cystitis. This condition causes irritation and inflammation in the bladder, which can be quite uncomfortable. However, there are ways to alleviate this syndrome and its effects on the body. If you eat a diet with plentiful green vegetables, stay away from spicy foods, don’t drink alcohol or smoke, and stay away from artificial sweeteners,  it will help raise the pH in your body.

Another great way to help with this syndrome is to drink more water so that the acids in your body become diluted. However, drinking regular tap water or bottled water is not likely to help because of the contamination that occurs during water treatment processes. Chlorine, fluoride, arsenals, prescriptions, and other bad chemicals seep into city and bottled water, raising the pH to a very acidic level.

alkaline waterAcidic water can actually cause some very dangerous health issues. The acids can take away healthy minerals from your organs and bones over time, leaving your body without the ones it needs to thrive.

This is where alkaline water comes in. Alkaline is a pH-raising benefit to water that adds healthy minerals. The effects of drinking alkaline water are that acids in your bloodstream are reduced, your metabolism increases, and your body can absorb nutrients a lot easier. Alkaline can not only help alleviate bladder issues, it can help with overall health. Most doctors recommend alkaline water to patients with bladder issues and other health issues like asthma. Dr. Jamie Koufman and Dr. Nikki Johnston found that alkaline water can reduce the symptoms of acid reflux. Some  studies even suggest that alkaline water can help cancer.

Alkalizer
How do you get alkaline water? From an alkalizer machine. An alkalizer is attached to a water source like an under-the-sink filtration system or whole-house filtration system and reduces acidity of the water that flows through it. Some alkalizers cost thousands of dollars, but there are more affordable systems in the market today.

To find out more about alkalizers, visit our Website , or to order your own alkalizer today, call us at: 1-800-550-1995

How Bottled Water is Exaserbating the California Drought

Water world

The good state of California only has so many reservoirs in its groundwater that can be tapped and used for drinking water. Some of these reservoirs are used for the biggest cities, like L.A., San Francisco, and San Diego, as city water that comes through their tap. But other reservoirs lie underneath land bought by bottled water companies like Nestlé and Crystal Gyser. These companies not only take the water underneath the land below them, they also suck up water from entire communities surrounding them. Then those companies sell it back to the people in that community for a profit! What they’re doing isn’t just unfair, it’s environmentally destructive. California’s drought has snowballed into our current situation over the past few decades, and this year it’s getting its worst statistics yet. The bottled water industry is doing nothing to change its course of action because, as CEO of Nest says, “It is a good civic responsibility to provide hydration and bottled water to the public.”

Although we agree that the public should be hydrated, bottled water is not the best path to making this happen. Firstly, most plastic water bottles that are used by companies in the industry have BPA. Bisphenol A (BPA) is a synthetic compound based from carbon that doesn’t change form when it comes in contact with water and is clear and tough. So all of these chemicals from the plastics used to make “disposable” water bottles are going into your body.

How can you help stop harmful chemicals from coming into your body while also ceasing bottled water companies from hurting California’s natural resources? The answer is simple, buy a BPA-free, filtering water bottle. By reusing a chemical-free water bottle that filters out the bad chemicals in your city water, you’re not only helping the environment, you’re creating a healthier lifestyle for yourself.

Check out our BPA-free, filtering water bottle that takes the toxins out of approx. 40 gallons of water. Equal to about 300 uses before you have to change the filter!

sports bottle white background

Sources:

Image 1: www.corsapro.es

How to Clean Up Your Water

From the Natural Resources Defense Council, here are some tips

In Your Yard

gravel driveway

1. Decrease impervious surfaces around your home. Having fewer hard surfaces of concrete and asphalt will reduce runoff from your property. Landscape with vegetation, gravel or other porous materials instead of cement; install wood decking instead of concrete, and interlocking bricks and paver stones for walkways. Redirect rain gutters and downspouts away from buildings and to rain barrels and gardens, soil, grass or gravel areas. Planting vegetation at lower elevations than nearby hard surfaces allows runoff to seep into soil.

2. Use native plants and natural fertilizers. Native plants need less water, are more tolerant of drought conditions, cost less to maintain and provide habitat for birds and butterflies. Apply natural fertilizers and soil conditioners, such as compost, peat, rotted manure, and bone meal to stimulate plant growth and retain soil moisture. You can create your own compost; compost bins are widely available for purchase, or you can make your own. Composting decreases the need for chemical fertilizers, helps soil retain moisture, and diverts waste from landfills. If you don’t know how to compost, visit The Compost Resource Page or the EPA’s composting pages.

3. Don’t over-water lawns and gardens. According to the EPA, “nationwide, landscape irrigation is estimated to account for almost one-third of all residential water use, totaling more than 7 billion gallons per day.” Most obviously, limit irrigation to vegetated areas -– prevent overspray onto sidewalks, driveways, and street curbing. Avoid sprinkler irrigation on steep slopes and narrow strips that cannot be watered efficiently. Know how much water your lawn is getting by using a rain gauge to track precipitation and match the amount of water you apply to the actual needs of your variety of turf. For non-turf areas, use slow-watering techniques, i.e. trickle or “drip” irrigation systems and soaker hoses, which are 20 percent more efficient than sprinklers. Over-watering lawns not only wastes water, but can also increase the leaching of fertilizers into groundwater. Watering before the sun comes up, or after it sets, will also decrease the amount of water lost to evaporation.

Purchasing a Filtercon Whole House Water Filtration system can also redistribute the used water to your yard. Your freshly used filter water can improve the vegetation in the area. Check out Filtercon’s website for more details or call 1-800-550-1995 to speak with a Filtercon expert.

In Your Home

empty paint can

4. Recycle and dispose of all trash properly. Never flush non-degradable products — such as disposable diapers or plastic tampon applicators — down the toilet. They can damage the sewage treatment process and end up littering beaches and waters. And make sure to properly dispose of all pet waste from your property to keep it out of storm drains and water supplies.

5. Correctly dispose of hazardous household products. Keep paints, used oil, cleaning solvents, polishes, pool chemicals, insecticides, and other hazardous household chemicals out of drains, sinks, and toilets. Many of these products contain harmful substances — such as sodium hypochlorite, petroleum distillates, phenol and cresol, ammonia and formaldehyde — that can end up in nearby water bodies. Contact your local sanitation, public works, or environmental health department to find out about hazardous waste collection days and sites, or check Earth911.com for local recycling options. If a local program isn’t available, request one. Additionally, incorrect disposal of pharmaceuticals and personal care products leads to the presence of pharmaceutical residues in our waterways and, ultimately, our drinking water. To keep pharmaceuticals and personal care products out of waterways, never flush them down the toilet. The best way to dispose of these items is through “take-back” programs where drugs are returned to a facility that can dispose of them properly. Contact your local health officials or household hazardous waste facility to find out what options exist in your region.

6. Use nontoxic household products whenever possible. Discarding harmful products correctly is important, but not buying them in the first place is even better. Ask local stores to carry nontoxic products if they don’t already. For examples of safe substitutes for environmentally harmful household products, check EPA’s Greener Products website.

Maintaining Your Car

motor oil

7. Recycle used motor oil. Don’t pour waste oil into gutters or down storm drains, and resist the temptation to dump wastes onto the ground. A single quart of motor oil that seeps into groundwater can pollute 250,000 gallons of drinking water. If you don’t have a place to recycle used motor oil in your community, ask your local sanitation or public works department to create one. Check Earth911.com for local recycling options. When you buy motor oil, ask if the store or service station has a program to buy back waste oil and dispose of it properly. Keep up with car maintenance to reduce leaking of oil, coolant, antifreeze and other hazardous fluids.

8. Be “green” when washing your car. Skip the home carwash. Take your car to a professional –- professional carwashes are required to drain their wastewater into sewer systems, where it is treated before being discharged. This spares your local rivers and bays from the brake fluid, oil and automotive fluids that could otherwise contaminate your water. Many carwashes also recycle their wastewater, and use less than half the amount of water of a home carwash. Ask around to find a carwash that practices wastewater recycling. Alternatively, you can “wash” your car at home using a waterless carwash product.

In Your Community

beach pollution

9. Help identify, report and stop polluters. Join a local clean water or environmental group that monitors industries and sewage treatment plants that are discharging wastes. Local groups can be effective working together with state environmental agencies, EPA and national groups like NRDC to ensure that industries comply with regulations. To find a local clean water organization in your area, contact the Clean Water Network or Waterkeeper Alliance.

Original Article Link: Clean Up Our Water