Tag Archives: house

National Geographic’s 5 Ways to Save Yard Water

National Geographic recently posted a wise article on ways to replace your lawn with water-saving plants and other alternatives so that you don’t use as much water during this extreme Californian drought. Here is the list that they created to help you and your family save water in your home… ”

astroturf

  1. Astroturf– Made famous on sports fields, synthetic grass, or astroturf, is becoming an increasingly popular choice for homeowners, from California to Virginia. A lot of research has gone into the material in recent years, to make it softer underfoot and to reduce the temperature it achieves under intense sun.
  2. Groundcover– Instead of grass, a wide range of ground covers can be used to keep out weeds and reduce erosion, which would otherwise be a problem if people suddenly ripped out their grass. Alternatives include rocks and mulch, some of which can be locally sourced. Crushed shells are popular for properties near a beach. Sand also is an option, particularly for those going for a Zen garden look.
  3. Native plants– Many traditional nurseries offer plants that are native to a local area. Native plants are adapted to the local climate and require little or no watering to thrive, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. [They] also can provide habitat for local birds, mammals, and insects. They typically earn points for green certification systems like LEED or can help homeowners achieve a “wildlife friendly” designation from their state or a nonprofit.
  4. Drought-tolerant grasses & shrubs– In addition to native plants, homeowners also can choose from a wide range of drought-tolerant grasses and shrubs from around the world. Examples include lavender, sage, kangaroo paw, and tea tree.                                           cactusinfo
  5. Desert plants– People can exchange grass for such water-sippers as succulents and cactus. These plants are often widely available at nurseries, and they can be kept in pots and moved indoors during colder months in cooler climates. They can be used in large numbers or as accents.  “

To learn how to save water in your house as well as in your yard, visit Filtercon Technologies‘ website or call us at 800-550-1995.

Source:

5 Water-Saving Ways to Replace Lawns During California’s Drought. National Geographic. May 21, 2015.  http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2015/05/150521-turf-terminators-xeriscape-california-drought-tolerant-lawns-water-savings/

Images:

1) suggestkeyword.com

2) cactusinfo.net

How Your Houseplants are Affected By Different Types of Water

houseplants

What’s the best way to make your houseplants grow strong and vibrant? Watering them. But often times, it’s easy to overlook what kind of water you’re feeding your plants. Tap water may cost less, but filtered water has many more advantages. Some tap water has harmful chemicals that can hurt you and your plants. Let’s take a look at the different types of water and their effects on houseplants…

Chlorine
Chlorine is often found in tap water and is used to kill diseases. Chlorine is a gas that evaporates out of water. That’s why you can smell chlorine. This has a terrible effect on houseplants and their growth. However, letting chlorine water sit and “breathe” for 24 hours before pouring it into your houseplants helps. Your water container also needs to be clean sot that the water going into your plants is pure.

Hard Water
There are some people whose tap water is what is called “hard water.” This simply means that the water has excessive amounts of minerals like magnesium or calcium. If this is your water, make sure not to use it on your houseplants.

Salt Water
Salt prevents the plants’ roots from absorbing water. This mineral forms around the plants’ cells, pulling water out of the plant as it starts settling in the soil. Although salt is found in tap water, the content is too low to be problematic.

Sugar Water
Unlike salt water, sugar causes bacteria to grow in the right environment. If you use this type of water, your houseplants will become unhealthy and die over time. It can also be a great place for fungus to grow, causing the same harmful effect on your plants.

Well Water
Well water nourishes houseplants. Since it comes from deep below ground, and it carries nutrients from the soil that plants need. It acts almost like a fertilizer, leading to greener and healthier plants. However, most people in urban areas are not privileged to this type of water.

boy

Bottled Water
This can get a little pricey. Not only that, but you never know where the water comes from or what types of contaminants are in its container.

Filtered Water
The best and most economical source for water is buying a whole house water filtration system. It provides chlorine free water that tastes great. Additionally, it removes heavy metals and pollutants that will give life back to your houseplants. You and your plants will benefit immensely from it.

Other notes: many times houseplants are killed due to over-watering. Before watering your plants, stick your finger in the soil about an inch down. If the soil is dry, water away. If the soil is still moist, there’s no need to water. Equally important factors to growing plants are sunlight and proper exposure.

For more information on whole house water filtration, visit http://www.filtercon.com or call us at 800-550-1995.

Images:

http://www.earthtimes.org/green-blogs/green-living/detoxifying-houseplants-21-May-11/

examiner.com