Tag Archives: living

Climate Change, Sierra Nevadas’ Snowmelt, & the Drought

Lake Sierra Nevada Mnts.

In alpine areas such as the Sierra Nevadas, snow cover is vital to water supply. Mountainous areas like this one provide water for entire watersheds. When snow melts, there can be three different results that occur. The snow can drift off of the surface level of the soil, it can evaporate, or it can replenish groundwater. Groundwater recharge is important because it helps to get underground water levels back up to a healthy level.

Sierra nevada sign

Less snowfall in the Sierra Nevadas has created an effect on humans, wildlife, and the environment. “The lower than historically normal snowfall in recent years is one environmental factor that has contributed to the current drought in California,” says Ryan Webb, a Ph.D. student in the department of civil and environmental engineering at Colorado State University.

Sierra snow depth

^The map above depicts the amount of Sierra Nevada snow depth in inches^

Webb and a group of researchers recently studied the changes in soil wetting and drying in alpine regions packed with snow. The study became published work. It specifically examined groundwater levels and their ability to recharge in the Sierra Nevada mountains in California. Due to changing climate conditions that have caused extensive change in groundwater levels, in these regions soils do not freeze during the winter and remain wet beneath the snowpack.

Ultimately, Webb and his group’s study will help understand how climate change impacts groundwater supplies, which is a precious resource in drought-stricken areas of the country.

Source:

Melting Snow and Groundwater Levels in Sierra Nevadas. Science Daily. August 20th, 2015.  http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/08/150820190321.htm

Images:

  1. fineartamerica.com
  2. europeinavan.com
  3. sierranevadaphotos.com

Why You Shouldn’t Be Drinking Water With High Fluoride Levels

The San Deigo Union Tribune printed this article in the Tuesday paper:

US URGES LOWER FLUORIDE LEVELS IN WATER

“The government is lowering the recommended amount of fluoride in drinking water because some kids are getting too much, causing white splotches on their teeth. It’s the first change since the government urged cities to add fluoride to water supplies to prevent tooth decay more than 50 years ago. Now, fluoride is put in toothpaste, mouthwash, and other products. One study found that about 2 out of 5 adolescents had tooth streaking or spottiness. It’s primarily a cosmetic issue, said Deputy Surgeon General Boris Lushniak, in announcing the new standard Monday. The mineral fluoride is in water and soil. About 70 years ago, scientists discovered that people whose drinking water naturally had more fluoride also had fewer cavities. Grand Rapids, Mich., became the world’s first city to add fluoride to its drinking water in 1945. Six years later, a study found a dramatic decline in tooth decay among children there, and the U.S. surgeon general endorsed water fluoridation. Today, about 75 percent of Americans get fluoridated water. But adding fluoride was-and has remained-controversial. Opponents argue its health effects aren’t completely understood and that adding it amounts to an unwanted medication. Since 1962, the government has recommended a range of 0.7 milligrams per liter for warmer climates where people drink more water to 1.2 milligrams in cooler areas. The new standard is 0.7 for all areas.”

With this information, it’s clear that you should rethink your position on drinking city water that has added fluoride without filtering it. Since fluoride became approved by the surgeon general, it has gotten more popular in products that help take care of your teeth: toothpaste, mouthwash, and varnishes. So how can you get less fluoride in your water? Filtercon’s

water treatment systems. Filtercon Technologies, based out of Mission Valley in San Diego, has a water treatment system for your home that removes harsh chemicals and contaminants that your city water automatically contains. It filters water that flows throughout all of the pipes in your house: your shower, faucets, and even hoses outside. Visit our website and watch the video below to learn more (click on link to watch video).

Untitled

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L2m31qI6X6M

Source: San Diego Union Tribune, Tuesday April 28th