Tag Archives: rivers

How San Diego is Saving Water during the Drought

Last week the San Diego community received the 2014 Annual Drinking Water Quality Report handbook. In it contains information about where the city’s water is sourced from, how the water treatment process works, how the city is diversifying our water, and how the city is moving towards more sustainable practices.

By 2035, the city of San Diego plans to have 1/3 of its drinking water supplied through a program that purifies recycled water. It is planned to produce about 15 million gallons of water for the city each day. The technology used to do so requires membrane filtration, reverse osmosis, advanced oxidation with ultraviolet light, and hydrogen peroxide. The city tested this method through a one-year project using 9,000 water quality tests and daily monitoring to ensure that no contaminants were present in the recycled water. The California Department of Public Health and San Diego Regional Water Quality Control Board approved the recycled water purifying process as it met all federal and state drinking water standards.

San Diego is also exploring ways to use groundwater basins to provide water storage, capture rainwater for recycling purposes, and implement an ocean desalination plant to produce desalinated water for use throughout San Diego County.

The 2014 Water Quality Report also states that the city has been mandated to reduce its water use by 16% as a whole. They are asking residents and businesses to identify where they can most save water and give tips on the best ways to do so. Some of these include: only watering your lawn two times per week, putting low-flow heads on your faucets and showerheads, and evaluating your pipes for possible water leaks. They are also urging residents to use the City’s Public Utilities Department website, wastenowater.org, for water-saving resource guides.

Are you wasting water throughout your home? Filtercon Technologies is a full-line water treatment company. They have whole-house water filters that don’t waste water, save you money, and keep you healthy! They are one of the most trusted water filtration systems in the state, and work mostly by referral. Check out their site, http://www.filtercon.com. Or call for more information at 800-550-1995.

Source:

The City of San Diego 2014 Annual Drinking Water Quality Report. City of San Diego Public Utilities Water & Wastewater. 2 July 2015.

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kidscures.org

Reducing Water Pollution

It’s inevitable that every system and process on Earth results in some sort of pollution. But thanks to an increase in education about water pollution, presently this is a growing concern. The definition of water pollution is a change in the quality of water, whether it be chemical, physical, or biological. Effects pollution can be harmful to those drinking or using it and particularly dangerous to humans.

water pollution
Water pollution, ironically enough, mostly stems from human impact. Oil tankers and mines contribute greatly to water pollution. Other human sources include factories or sewage treatment plants.

How do can you tell if the water near you is polluted? Well, you can’t tell just by looking at it. The only sure way is to scientifically test a small sample. Many companies, like Filtercon for example, offer test kits to test your water at home for water pollution.

Here are some simple thing you can do in your life to prevent water from being polluted:
fish in polluted water
Non-Toxic Products
Rainwater can wash unsafe substances into nearby rivers, oceans, and other bodies of water. For this reason, try buying products that are not harmful to the environment. This includes BPA-free bottles, artificial air fresheners and disinfectants, chemical fertilizers, and flame retardants. You can find products that aren’t harmful to the environment in most local stores. If you use toxic products, simply dispose of them correctly (take them to hazardous waste sites) so they do not cause water pollution. Make sure that you aren’t dumping chemicals down the drain and check out your city’s local hazardous waste dropoff site.

Motor Oil and Cooking Oil
A good practice is not to allow your car to drip motor oil on the ground. Contact your local waste site and ask them when you can dispose of it properly to them. The same goes for cooking oil and paint, it’s a good idea not to put it down faucet. Many restaurants have a grease bin where they dispose of their cooking oil. If you can’t find a place to properly dispose of your cooking oil, ask a restaurant close by.

watering can
Yard Care
The best type of yard fertilizer for your yard is a non-toxic fertilizer, like compost. Toxic fertilizers turn into ocean and lake pollution when it rains. They can also be absorbed in the water supply, which is a result of poor drainage in the yard. It’s also good to not overwater your yard if you are using toxic fertilizer.

Dog Friendly
When walking your dog, clean up after him/her. It is courtesy, of course, but their stool sometimes can find their way to our water supply.

Your Toilet
Some people use their toilet as a garbage can. Please do not make this mistake. It is polluting to add items like dirty diapers, sanitary napkins, and tampon applicators to your toilet drainage. These items could end up polluting the ocean and can damage the water treatment effort.

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