Tag Archives: sun

National Geographic’s 5 Ways to Save Yard Water

National Geographic recently posted a wise article on ways to replace your lawn with water-saving plants and other alternatives so that you don’t use as much water during this extreme Californian drought. Here is the list that they created to help you and your family save water in your home… ”

astroturf

  1. Astroturf– Made famous on sports fields, synthetic grass, or astroturf, is becoming an increasingly popular choice for homeowners, from California to Virginia. A lot of research has gone into the material in recent years, to make it softer underfoot and to reduce the temperature it achieves under intense sun.
  2. Groundcover– Instead of grass, a wide range of ground covers can be used to keep out weeds and reduce erosion, which would otherwise be a problem if people suddenly ripped out their grass. Alternatives include rocks and mulch, some of which can be locally sourced. Crushed shells are popular for properties near a beach. Sand also is an option, particularly for those going for a Zen garden look.
  3. Native plants– Many traditional nurseries offer plants that are native to a local area. Native plants are adapted to the local climate and require little or no watering to thrive, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. [They] also can provide habitat for local birds, mammals, and insects. They typically earn points for green certification systems like LEED or can help homeowners achieve a “wildlife friendly” designation from their state or a nonprofit.
  4. Drought-tolerant grasses & shrubs– In addition to native plants, homeowners also can choose from a wide range of drought-tolerant grasses and shrubs from around the world. Examples include lavender, sage, kangaroo paw, and tea tree.                                           cactusinfo
  5. Desert plants– People can exchange grass for such water-sippers as succulents and cactus. These plants are often widely available at nurseries, and they can be kept in pots and moved indoors during colder months in cooler climates. They can be used in large numbers or as accents.  “

To learn how to save water in your house as well as in your yard, visit Filtercon Technologies‘ website or call us at 800-550-1995.

Source:

5 Water-Saving Ways to Replace Lawns During California’s Drought. National Geographic. May 21, 2015.  http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2015/05/150521-turf-terminators-xeriscape-california-drought-tolerant-lawns-water-savings/

Images:

1) suggestkeyword.com

2) cactusinfo.net

Exercising in the Heat

prevent-heat-illness-art

Summer is here. We all want to have those great bikini or board short bodies, but a lot of us exercise outside and it gets hot in the summer. So what should we do?

Well, let’s learn about what happens to us when exercising in the heat. When running in hotter weather (when the temperature is above 75 degrees Farenheight), our bodies spend about 70% of the energy that they normally would be using towards our workout to just cool down. Only 30% goes to moving our arms and legs and breathing. What’s more, the heat, humidity, and UV rays all have a negative effect on us because we aren’t used to putting our bodies to work in such harsh environments. The heat makes us sweat, the humidity doesn’t allow our cooling processes to occur as effectively, and UV rays burn our skin which makes our core temperature higher.

But the good news is that after 1-2 weeks of working out in hotter weather, your body starts to acclimate. John Woo, M.D., a clinical associate professor at the University of Washington School of Medicine says, “Your body will expect circulating plasma volume and become more efficient in sweating, and, psychologically, you just start dealing with the heat better.” To help this process occur safely, start out by cutting your workout in the heat in half and add 5% every day or 10% every couple of days or so. You can even finish the rest of your workout inside (do core work, lift weights, do a yoga routine) until you get back up to 100% of your workout in the heat. Other things you should be doing to help this process occur safely are: drink 8 glasses of water throughout the day, make sure to get enough electrolytes, and use sunscreen.

If you follow these simple steps to working out in the heat, your body will thank you. To learn more about the body and effects of water on the body, check out our other blog posts or visit our website (www.filtercon.com) to learn about why it’s important to filter your water at home.

Source:

What Running in the Heat Does to Your Body. SHAPE Fitness. 7 July 2015. http://www.shape.com/fitness/cardio/what-running-heat-does-your-body

Image:
http://www.fitbe.com