Tag Archives: temperature

El Nino is Coming

Wondering if El Nino is really coming for all of us in California? Well look no further, because the NOAA National Weather Service Climate Prediction Center has answered your questions.

To sum their Aug 13th report up, “There is a greater than 90% chance that El Niño will continue through Northern Hemisphere winter 2015-16, and around an 85% chance it will last into early spring 2016.”

How can scientists tell that this is really happening? Atmospheric and oceanic conditions have been portraying El Nino features. Some of these features include increases in sea temperatures, specific movement of Kelvin waves, and exact positions of wind movement. These features emulate those of a former El Nino; the 1997 El Nino ocean temperatures were just as high as those today, and scientists say today’s El Nino may even top that of 1997.

El Nino

So get out your rain jackets, boots, and skis, and prepare for the 2015/2016 El Nino that could help you to have the best shred yet.

Image:

climatecentral.org

Is it better to go cold or hot?

tea

Have you ever wondered what kind of water is best for your body during a meal? We order hot tea when we’re sick but ice cold water after a long day at the beach. Which is best for your overall health? Sorry to upset those ice cold water lovers, but drinking cold water can be harmful, especially if you eat unhealthy. Cold water solidifies oils in your body that you consume after eating and slows digestion. Once the solidified particles react with acids that break down your food, they are absorbed by the intestine faster than solid food. The result is a film that lines the intestine and create fatty deposits that can lead to cancer.

What’s worse, the more oily foods you eat, the more rapidly this process occurs in your body. Eating unhealthily and drinking cold water every time you consume food can lead to other grave health risks such as heart disease and diabetes.

Since it takes energy for your body to cool down low temperature water, that means it takes calories to do so. If you drink warmer water with a meal, like hot soup or tea, all of these risks stated above will be less likely to occur. Take a moment to think about what you’re eating for dinner tonight and pair your meal with a nice green or herbal tea. Or pick a water-based soup like thai coconut or chicken noodle.

All of these steps reduce your risk for illness and diseases. To check out more about heart health, visit http://www.heart.org. To learn more about water, check out filtercon.com or call us at 800-550-1995.

Image:

az-teas.com

National Geographic’s 5 Ways to Save Yard Water

National Geographic recently posted a wise article on ways to replace your lawn with water-saving plants and other alternatives so that you don’t use as much water during this extreme Californian drought. Here is the list that they created to help you and your family save water in your home… ”

astroturf

  1. Astroturf– Made famous on sports fields, synthetic grass, or astroturf, is becoming an increasingly popular choice for homeowners, from California to Virginia. A lot of research has gone into the material in recent years, to make it softer underfoot and to reduce the temperature it achieves under intense sun.
  2. Groundcover– Instead of grass, a wide range of ground covers can be used to keep out weeds and reduce erosion, which would otherwise be a problem if people suddenly ripped out their grass. Alternatives include rocks and mulch, some of which can be locally sourced. Crushed shells are popular for properties near a beach. Sand also is an option, particularly for those going for a Zen garden look.
  3. Native plants– Many traditional nurseries offer plants that are native to a local area. Native plants are adapted to the local climate and require little or no watering to thrive, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. [They] also can provide habitat for local birds, mammals, and insects. They typically earn points for green certification systems like LEED or can help homeowners achieve a “wildlife friendly” designation from their state or a nonprofit.
  4. Drought-tolerant grasses & shrubs– In addition to native plants, homeowners also can choose from a wide range of drought-tolerant grasses and shrubs from around the world. Examples include lavender, sage, kangaroo paw, and tea tree.                                           cactusinfo
  5. Desert plants– People can exchange grass for such water-sippers as succulents and cactus. These plants are often widely available at nurseries, and they can be kept in pots and moved indoors during colder months in cooler climates. They can be used in large numbers or as accents.  “

To learn how to save water in your house as well as in your yard, visit Filtercon Technologies‘ website or call us at 800-550-1995.

Source:

5 Water-Saving Ways to Replace Lawns During California’s Drought. National Geographic. May 21, 2015.  http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2015/05/150521-turf-terminators-xeriscape-california-drought-tolerant-lawns-water-savings/

Images:

1) suggestkeyword.com

2) cactusinfo.net

Making Sure Your Pets Are Healthy This Summer

Picture Desk Project - The World Needs Hugs by Andrew Davies - published by Robson books /  page 55 (2of2) ...  Hug the one you're with ...

Dog? Cat? Ferret? Koala? Our pets are important to us, which is why we need to always make sure they’re healthy. Part of that means making sure they aren’t outside in the heat for too long and making sure they get enough water. Did you know that animals can survive if they lose all of their body fat, but can become seriously ill if they lose just 10% of the water in their body? It’s a scary thought to think about Fido getting heatstroke, so make sure that you take the necessary steps to keep your pet healthy. Here are some tips for keeping your pet out of the heat and making sure they’re hydrated:

1) Don’t leave your pet in the car for more than 10-15 minutes in temperatures over 65 degrees Farenheight, especially if he/she is known to have have respiratory issues

2) Make sure your pet has water. Living things need water to survive, this is a fact. Your pet is no exception. If you’re traveling, make sure you have a bowl or bottle so that you can give your pet the water it needs to stay hydrated

3) Don’t trim too much hair off of your pet. The layers of your pet’s coat help to keep them from getting a sunburn and overheating. It’s okay to trim long hair, but remember that hair works differently for pets than it does for humans

4) Sometimes it’s better to leave your pet at home. We know you think your puppy or bunny is soooooo cute, but heat affects animals differently than it does humans. So think about letting your pet get some rest in the shade rather than taking him/her on that 6 mile hike you’re going on this weekend

5) KNOW THE SIGNS. When your dog is panting or your cat is trying to find a shady spot under a tree, make sure he/she is okay. For more information on signs and symptoms that your pet may be ill, visit petmd.com

ferret on leash

Filtercon Technologies is a full-line water filtration company located in San Diego, California. We know it gets hot out here, and we know we have to keep our pets hydrated while also doing our part to save water during this drought. Our company creates sustainable water filters that purify water without wasting it. With our products, Fido will be healthy and you’ll be saving money.  Check out our website, http://www.filtercon.com, or give us a call at 800-550-1995 for more info.

Images:

1) www.dailymail.co.uk

2) lubbockonline.com

Exercising in the Heat

prevent-heat-illness-art

Summer is here. We all want to have those great bikini or board short bodies, but a lot of us exercise outside and it gets hot in the summer. So what should we do?

Well, let’s learn about what happens to us when exercising in the heat. When running in hotter weather (when the temperature is above 75 degrees Farenheight), our bodies spend about 70% of the energy that they normally would be using towards our workout to just cool down. Only 30% goes to moving our arms and legs and breathing. What’s more, the heat, humidity, and UV rays all have a negative effect on us because we aren’t used to putting our bodies to work in such harsh environments. The heat makes us sweat, the humidity doesn’t allow our cooling processes to occur as effectively, and UV rays burn our skin which makes our core temperature higher.

But the good news is that after 1-2 weeks of working out in hotter weather, your body starts to acclimate. John Woo, M.D., a clinical associate professor at the University of Washington School of Medicine says, “Your body will expect circulating plasma volume and become more efficient in sweating, and, psychologically, you just start dealing with the heat better.” To help this process occur safely, start out by cutting your workout in the heat in half and add 5% every day or 10% every couple of days or so. You can even finish the rest of your workout inside (do core work, lift weights, do a yoga routine) until you get back up to 100% of your workout in the heat. Other things you should be doing to help this process occur safely are: drink 8 glasses of water throughout the day, make sure to get enough electrolytes, and use sunscreen.

If you follow these simple steps to working out in the heat, your body will thank you. To learn more about the body and effects of water on the body, check out our other blog posts or visit our website (www.filtercon.com) to learn about why it’s important to filter your water at home.

Source:

What Running in the Heat Does to Your Body. SHAPE Fitness. 7 July 2015. http://www.shape.com/fitness/cardio/what-running-heat-does-your-body

Image:
http://www.fitbe.com