Tag Archives: union tribune

The Cost of Saving Water in California

What happens when we start saving more water during this seemingly never-ending drought? Rates for water increase. In a fixed-cost industry, the price of water increases when low supply equals high demand. “If you want to buy water on the market this year, the price is 10 times higher,” says Timothy Quinn, executive director of the Association of California Water Agencies.

But the districts, who are selling the water directly to these households and businesses, have no choice but to do so. The Union Tribune explains it like this, “If you sell less of something, you must cut costs, boost prices, or do both to balance the budget.” This cut hurts during a time when business and homeowners are working hard to use less H2O. Water consumers in San Diego County (and the rest of the state) have been not only meeting, but exceeding state-mandated water reductions. Some residents believe that the price increase is unfair and that officials should find a way to keep them down.

And the increase in prices won’t stop here. Next year, San Diego county officials proposed to raise prices 17%. In San Diego, the monthly price for a family of four using 50 gallons of water per person per day is $49. So this price will go up about $8 for a family in this situation, making their water bill $58 a month. To make matters worse, San Diego residents get higher bills due to the fact that California gets most of its water from pipelines and aqueducts in Northern California and the Colorado River. The longer the distance for water to travel, the more it costs due to delivery costs and vulnerability to water deliveries.

Although it’s frustrating to save water at a time like this, there’s not much we can do. To help save water, you should buy a water-saving filtration system for your home. To find out more, visit http://www.filtercon.com or call us at 800-550-1995.

Sources:

Higher Water Bills Likely. San Diego Union Tribune. 27 July 2015. http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/news/2015/jul/27/tp-higher-water-bills-likely/

Image- waterwealthproject.com

The Irony of Bottling Companies and the Drought

One bottling company’s vague policies have sparked discourse on the relationship between California’s drought and bottling water in California. How much groundwater are these companies using? Would it affect the drought if these companies no longer bottled? Who oversees groundwater usage rules? Which companies in California use the most water for these purposes? These are questions that have been asked frequently during the eruption of conversation about bottling water and the drought. Let’s take a further look into the conversation…

palomar

It started with Palomar Mountain Spring Water, a bottling company based in San Diego County and located on Palomar Mountain. How bottled water companies work is that they buy land located on large reservoirs of groundwater and use the water to bottle and disperse to the community for a fee. These resources do not have limits; “The spring is also not subject to the kind of drought restrictions that are causing residents across San Diego County to let lawns brown and leave toilets unflushed,” says Morgan Cook from the Union Tribune. It is also uncertain how much groundwater is being used by these companies for bottling purposes because they are not required to release information about usage of the springs that they own.

groundwater

-But wait, shouldn’t that be public information? ‘”The complaints that we don’t really know what they’re doing, the complaint that they’re taking a public resource and commercializing it at a great profit- these are all real problems…,” says Peter Gleick who is the president of a water think tank in Oakland.’ The Union Tribune posted this and other thoughts about this in their article No Drought Rules for Bottled Water, which was released today (6/8/15).

plastic water bottle

Another issue that the article brought up was the fact that Palomar Springs is just one of many bottling companies that have taken advantage of the fact that bottled water natural resources are unrestricted. Six companies in the San Diego area alone are included in this category, of which draw from resources like the Lakeside springs, Palomar Mountain area, Santee, and private wells. And because these companies have the right to not have to report the amounts of water they use, no one knows which companies are using more than others.

All of this being said, bottled water is not the ultimate source of the California drought. Although these companies may be helping to exacerbate its severity, the drought situation in California derives from many other sources, including natural disasters (forest fires, earthquakes, and storms), climate change, and human impact on the environment.

If you’d like to learn more about the article in the San Diego Union Tribune, check out their link below. If you’d like to learn how you can help the environment save and recycle water, visit filtercon.com for more information.

Sources:

San Diego Union Tribune, “No Drought Rules for Bottled Water”. 6/8/15.  http://www.utsandiego.com/news/2015/jun/08/tp-no-drought-rules-for-bottled-water/2/?#article-copy

http://www.palomarwater.com/contact.php

http://www.groundwateruk.org/Image-Gallery.aspx

https://learn.flexport.com/import-water-bottles/

California State Water Cuts Passed

The headline of the Union Tribune San Diego on Wednesday read “Sweeping Water Cuts Ok’d,” meaning that, “for the first time in the state’s history, [the] board imposes mandatory conservation rules amid drought.” The rest of the article reads…

faucet water

“HIGHER WATER RATES: The state’s required cuts in water use will result in an estimated loss of more than $500 million in sales by water agencies. The water districts are expected to make that up by raising rates on customers.”

sprinkler

REDUCTION TARGETS: Water agencies must cut back by 8 percent to 36 percent, with agencies that had the lowest per capita water use facing the smallest percentage reductions and those using the most water having the biggest cuts.”

100dollarbill

PENALTIES: Water districts could be fined $10,000 per day if they don’t meet the mandated targets, but the state is stressing conservation over fines. Gov. Jerry Brown also recently suggested $10,000 fines for the worst water wasters.”

“In a sweeping action that could lead to the browning of lawns and shorter showers across California, state regulators approved mandatory water cuts Tuesday of up to 36 percent for cities and towns in the drought-ridden state. The 5-0 vote by the State Water Resources Control Board follows Gov. Jerry Brown’s unprecedented order last month that the state reduce its overall water usage by 25 percent. The vote followed a report on meager water savings in March by California’s cities and towns — 3.6 percent statewide compared with two years ago — despite more than a year of dire warnings by Brown and others about the shrinking supply. Along with imposing water cuts, the board prohibited the use of potable water on public street medians. It also banned using drinking water outside newly constructed homes and buildings, unless delivered by drip or microspray irrigation. The package of restrictions is expected to go into effect May 15 and last until February. Officials said the conservation mandates could get tougher next year depending on how long the drought persists. “This is the best we can do in the short run,” said Felicia Marcus, the water board’s chair. “The whole point of this is dealing with an unprecedented emergency.” It’s expected that water districts will increase customer rates to make up for more than $500 million in estimated lost revenue because of reduced water sales. The state left it to the districts to figure out how to conserve. Agencies that don’t meet the state mandates face the prospect of $10,000-per-day fines, though the state panel has emphasized its goal is conservation, not fines. The mandatory cuts range from 8 percent for water districts with the smallest per capita water usage to 36 percent for those with the highest, including in Rancho Santa Fe, Fallbrook, Olivenhain and Valley Center. The city of San Diego’s Water Department faces a 16 percent reduction.”

If you want to help out your family, California, and our world, let’s work together to save water. Filtercon family water filtration systems can help you do just that because they don’t waste water. Trade in your old fashioned water softener that uses salt and wastes water for our modern technology. If you need a water filter for your whole house or just a filtered water bottle that eliminates bacteria and viruses, Filtercon has just that. Check out our video below, website at http://www.filtercon.com, or call our toll-free number (1-800-550-1995) to get more information about your clean water system.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8eu98SLTBoM

Sources:

http://www.utsandiego.com/news/2015/may/06/tp-sweeping-water-cuts-okd/?#article-copy

running faucet

https://scomberfresh.wordpress.com/2010/07/22/100-dollar-bills-gimmie-some/